12 July 2006

‘Imagining the Tenth Dimension’

In string theory, physicists tell us that the subatomic particles that make up our universe are created within ten spatial dimensions (plus an eleventh dimension of "time") by the vibrations of exquisitely small "superstrings." The average person has barely gotten used to the idea of there being four dimensions: how can we possibly imagine the tenth?

http://www.tenthdimension.com/

Visit the site and click on "Imagining the Ten Dimensions" under the Navigation sidebar. This will lead you through an interesting Flash overview.

In other science news, I came across this article (via Mind Hacks à la 3Quarks) entitled "Science and the Theft of Humanity." This American Scientist article bemoans the division of research into schools and traditions in modern universities as counter productive, and argues that the cognitive and biological sciences are now at the forefront of combining science and art practice.

I would probably argue philosophy has always had a similarly broad outlook, but the author argues that science is where the new action is. What does this imply for occultism in general?
…but while humanistic scholars have been presuming core facts about human nature, human capacities and human being, scientists have been getting to work. One of the most striking features of contemporary intellectual life is the fact that questions formerly reserved for the humanities are today being approached by scientists in various disciplines such as cognitive science, cognitive neuroscience, robotics, artificial life, behavioral genetics and evolutionary biology.

Which reminds me of my post from April, A third scientific culture.

03 July 2006

Witchcraft ban ends in Zimbabwe

Thanks to Annan for bringing this to my attention!—
Zimbabwe has unbanned the practice of witchcraft, repealing legislation dating back to colonial rule.

From July the government acknowledges that supernatural powers exists - but prohibits the use of magic to cause someone harm.

In 1899, colonial settlers made it a crime to accuse someone of being a witch or wizard - wary of the witch hunts in Europe a few centuries earlier which saw many people burned at the stake after such accusations.

But to most Zimbabweans, especially those who grew up in the rural areas, it has been absurd to say that the supernatural does not exist.

In fact, it is not hard to find vivid stories about the use of magic.

continued via BBC News